Dr Davidson
rating: 0+x

Item #: SCP-5000

Object Class: Keter

Special Containment Procedures: To reduce the incidence of SCP-5000, all other SCP objects should be assigned to one of four risk categories:

  • Inanimate or uncontained objects are considered low-risk. Personnel assigned to low-risk objects do not need to take SCP-5000 into consideration, unless later discoveries place the object in a higher risk category. Objects with animate components are animate, and are not considered low-risk if contained.
  • Animate, contained objects are at least considered medium-risk. Personnel with Level 3 clearance or higher must be informed of SCP-5000 before working with medium-risk objects. They are encouraged to take SCP-5000's containment procedures into account. SCP-5000 training courses are available on request.
  • Animate, contained objects that meet three or four of the following conditions are considered high-risk: the object has demonstrated sapience, the object is humanoid, the object appears as a child or an entity appealing to children, the object is female or presents itself as feminine, the object did not readily accept its containment, the object is not by default hostile towards unfamiliar humans. Personnel with Level 2 clearance or higher must be informed of SCP-5000 before working with high-risk objects, and are encouraged to enroll in an SCP-5000 training course. Each team responsible for a high-risk object must submit an annual assessment report detailing the work they have done to mitigate the chance of an SCP-5000 event, as well as their preparations for such an event.
  • Animate, contained objects that meet five or six of the following conditions are considered critical-risk: the object has demonstrated sapience, the object is humanoid, the object appears as a child or an entity appealing to children, the object is female or presents itself as feminine, the object did not readily accept its containment, the object is not by default hostile towards unfamiliar humans. Personnel with Level 2 clearance or higher must be informed of SCP-5000 before working with critical-risk objects. At bare minimum, 10% of personnel assigned to any critical-risk object must have completed a full SCP-5000 training course. Each team responsible for a critical-risk object must submit a quarterly assessment report detailing the work they have done to mitigate the chance of an SCP-5000 event, as well as their preparations for such an event. As SCP-5000 events are to be expected in the containment of critical-risk objects, errors of judgement that lead to SCP-5000 events in critical-risk objects will be scrutinized and punished more severely than similar errors concerning objects in lower risk categories.

Any newly-obtained object should be assigned to a risk category as soon as is feasible. Preliminary SCP-5000 assessment reports are due one week (168 hours) after a high-risk or critical-risk object is recovered, or one week (168 hours) after an object is reassigned to high-risk or critical-risk from a lower risk category. When the containment procedures for a high-risk or critical-risk object remain in flux because research is ongoing, SCP-5000 assessment reports should be submitted weekly, not annually or quarterly. The willful omission or fabrication of important details in SCP-5000 assessment reports, as well as the willful assignment of an object to a lower risk category than merited, are grounds for disciplinary action including termination.

Upon recovering any high-risk or critical-risk object (whether for the first time or following a containment breach), field agents should investigate the site of recovery and any other known past locations of the object. Medium-risk objects may also receive such investigations at the discretion of the object's project manager. The purpose of these investigations is to identify SCP-5000-B candidates who may have preexisting connections to the object. If identified, these SCP-5000-B candidates should be covertly surveiled until they turn 16 (or later, at the discretion of the object's project manager).

While bringing any personnel onto a high-risk or critical-risk object, routine background checks must be used to identify any SCP-5000-B candidates connected to the prospective hire. Prospective hires with greater connections to SCP-5000-B candidates must face quantitative penalties in all staffing decisions, which must be detailed in the object's SCP-5000 assessment report. If personnel connected to SCP-5000-B candidates do wind up working with high-risk or critical-risk objects, those SCP-5000-B candidates must be covertly surveiled until they turn 16 (or later, at the discretion of the object's project manager).

Isolating SCP-5000-B candidates from one another is a priority preemptive measure. However, because of the nature of SCP-5000, any action taken to isolate SCP-5000-B candidates - or even to surveil them - risks generating an O-class self-fulfilling prophecy scenario. Consequently, surveillance and isolation operations on SCP-5000-B candidates must work subtly, and must take the mental stability of the SCP-5000-B candidates into account; healthy social ties between SCP-5000-B candidates and adults are preferable to total social isolation. If an SCP-5000-B candidate realizes they are being surveiled, emergency measures must immediately be taken to amnesticize the SCP-5000-B candidate and prevent the realization from recurring. The SCP-5000-B candidate may need to be transferred to a distant residence (for example, in a different town) to lower the chance of initiating an SCP-5000 event.

SCP-5000-B groups discovered in Stage I or Stage II must be immediately detained, interrogated, amnesticized, and separated.1 To exercise full caution, each SCP-5000-B instance should be moved to a different town. The communications of the SCP-5000-B instances must be monitored to ensure that they do not recontact one another.

Standard monitoring of missing person reports will sometimes alert Foundation security to SCP-5000-B groups entering Stage III which were not caught in advance by other screening methods. SCP-5000-B groups discovered in this way must be located as soon as possible in order to disrupt the SCP-5000 event. Mobile Task Forces Delta-1 ("Hardy Men"), Epsilon-2 ("Child Catchers"), and Kappa-5 ("We Dissected Alf") specialize in SCP-5000, and can be promptly diverted to the location of any suspected SCP-5000 event.

Lethal force is always authorized against SCP-5000-B groups in Stage III or Stage IV,2 but if the opportunity arises, these SCP-5000-B groups should be captured alive for interrogation. Personnel who have taken the appropriate training course may attempt to talk down SCP-5000-B groups in Stage III, but this tactic must never be used simply to avoid the use of force. SCP-5000-B groups captured in Stage III or Stage IV must be separated and detained at different sites to prevent them from collaborating and building on the ties produced by SCP-5000. These SCP-5000-B instances must remain in the Foundation's custody indefinitely, as they are too appealing as recruits for hostile groups of interest.

A past SCP-5000 event is a significant risk factor for future SCP-5000 events. Whenever an SCP-5000 event has concluded - whether in disruption or in containment breach - all affected objects and communities must be marked and monitored more closely in the future, to avoid a cascading SCP-5000 scenario.

On a case-by-case basis, the Foundation may offer aid to groups of interest beset by their own SCP-5000 events. Mobile Task Force Epsilon-2 ("Child Catchers") exists specifically for this purpose, and primarily works with Marshall, Carter, and Dark Ltd.3 Groups unwilling to enter long-term negotiations with the Foundation may still receive aid in particularly volatile situations where SCP-5000 is deemed likely to cause a K-class scenario. The Serpent's Hand believes that it is allied with SCP-5000, and should always be considered hostile in matters pertaining to SCP-5000.

SCP-5000 is a probability-altering anomaly, not a mind-altering anomaly. Any employee whose misconduct enables an SCP-5000 event will be held fully accountable.

Description: SCP-5000 is a recurring phenomenon that interferes with the containment of anomalies. SCP-5000 events center on specific, animate anomalies (referred to as instances of SCP-5000-A), but often lead to much larger-scale containment breaches involving many objects. SCP-5000 is the second most common cause of containment breach for the Foundation.4

SCP-5000 begins by manipulating probability to organize a group of children (referred to as instances of SCP-5000-B) around the goal of breaching containment of a particular SCP-5000-A. SCP-5000 continues to aid the SCP-5000-B group through unlikely coincidences until SCP-5000-A breaches containment or the SCP-5000 event is successfully disrupted. SCP-5000 events will sometimes self-disrupt without any deliberate intervention, but this happens far less than would naturally be expected.

The further an SCP-5000 event progresses, the more catastrophic its likely outcome. Four primary stages of SCP-5000 progression have been identified, although in practice they often blur into one another:

  • Stage I is defined by the formation of the SCP-5000-B group. An SCP-5000-B group consists of three to eight instances of SCP-5000-B. Sometimes, the entire SCP-5000-B group becomes aware of SCP-5000-A's containment simultaneously. More frequently, however, a subset of the group, such as a single SCP-5000-B leader, becomes aware of SCP-5000-A's containment and then informs the rest of the group. The end of Stage I is marked by the SCP-5000-B group making a shared commitment to breach containment of SCP-5000-A.
  • Stage II is defined by the SCP-5000-B group gathering information. In this stage, the SCP-5000-B group will covertly learn what they can about SCP-5000-A and the organization that contains it. SCP-5000-B groups tend to engage in precisely-targeted social engineering attacks - although this precise targeting is mostly SCP-5000's work, not their own. Even with strong security measures put in place, SCP-5000-B groups are likely to obtain classified documents during this stage, and will acquire some understanding of Foundation operations and structure. The end of Stage II is marked by the SCP-5000-B group settling on a plan (however vague) to breach containment of SCP-5000-A. This usually entails running away from home; SCP-5000-B instances may or may not intend to return to their previous lives at the conclusion of the SCP-5000 event.
  • Stage III is defined by the SCP-5000-B group preparing for the attack. The SCP-5000-B group finishes acquiring any needed supplies during this stage, and positions itself to breach containment of SCP-5000-A. This stage sometimes involves its own containment breaches separate from the main targeted containment breach, as the SCP-5000-B group attempts to steal objects they expect to be helpful. The end of Stage III is marked by the SCP-5000-B group directly initiating SCP-5000-A's containment breach.
  • Stage IV is defined by SCP-5000-A breaching containment. This is a bottleneck for SCP-5000-B instances, which usually die around this point in time. While containment of SCP-5000-A can often be reestablished soon afterwards, damage is still done. Other objects often breach containment alongside SCP-5000-A, and the chaos of the situation may lead to one or more of these objects being neutralized. Most SCP-5000 events that reach Stage IV involve significant casualties among Foundation personnel.

The median instance of SCP-5000-B is 11 years old at the start of the SCP-5000 event, with a standard distribution of 18 months. SCP-5000-B groups mostly consist of close age peers (i.e. children from a single grade level), but a group will sometimes contain an older tagalong, a younger tagalong, or both. These tagalongs are usually a sibling of another member of the SCP-5000-B group. This non-age-peer tagalong pattern accounts for almost all SCP-5000-B instances whose ages fall outside the 95% confidence interval (8-15).

About 77% of SCP-5000-B instances are male. Although all-female SCP-5000-B groups have been repeatedly observed, most female SCP-5000-B instances are either non-age-peer tagalongs or the only girl in a group otherwise composed of boys. Female SCP-5000-B instances in majority-male SCP-5000-B groups are critical for morale and group structure, and are priority targets for either violent or non-violent means of disrupting the SCP-5000 event.

Identical twins are disproportionately likely to become SCP-5000-B instances (2.6% of SCP-5000-B instances, as opposed to 0.3% of the global population), and their presence is consequently a strong leading indicator of an SCP-5000 event. No three-person SCP-5000-B group has ever contained a pair of identical twins, and every eight-person SCP-5000-B group has contained a pair of identical twins. From this, it is inferred that SCP-5000 intends an upper limit of seven SCP-5000-B instances per group, but does not view identical twins as separate individuals.

The root cause of SCP-5000 remains unknown. Multiple groups or persons of interest have been suspected of responsibility for SCP-5000,5 but subsequently cleared. On 06/06/1993, Serpent's Hand member D.H. took credit for creating SCP-5000. However, her account is not credible, and was presumably intended as a propaganda and recruiting tool.

Notable SCP-5000 Events: